What is the Travel Effect?

Travel Effect is the feeling you get taking a step away from the busyness of life. Using your earned time off—whether around the house or on a trip—recharges your batteries and lifts the weight off your shoulders. Give it a try. Take a day off and experience the Travel Effect.

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Taking a Vacation May Actually Save Your Career

Bryce Covert breaks down the importance of taking a vacation for your career and the economy for New Republic. Based on the latest research, Bryce says being “crazy, driven, hard-working believers,” in Cadillac’s words, isn’t working out so well for the 99 percent.

Travel industry to Americans: "Take your vacation"

It's bad enough that U.S. workers get less paid vacation than their counterparts around the world, but many are afraid to take all the time off employers provide. The situation has become so glaring that the U.S. travel industry is actually starting a promotional effort to encourage people to take vacation.

Why Taking a Vacation Can Make You Better at Your Job

We say we want more time off, but most of us don't use all of our vacation time. Lisa Evan shares how life won't fall apart if you take two weeks off, in fact your work might actually improve. 

429 million vacation days go unused - Bad for workers, employers, economy

When my Dad was 72, he would joke that he didn’t want to retire because he enjoyed his vacations too much. My parents were among the vanguard of jetsetters in the 1960s, taking advantage of an onslaught of jumbo aircraft and affordable air fares. Karen Rubin writes of how things have changed and the Travel Effect for Examiner.com.

What Would You Do with an Extra Day?

America has one of the longest workweeks in the world. So it’s good news that nearly three in four employees earn some kind of time off, with an average benefit of 20 days per year. Gary Oster, Managing Director of Travel Effect, shares his Travel Effect with the American Resort Development Association's Vacation Better

Latest Info

The Day Off Dividend

February 27, 2014

Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Travel Association today announced an unprecedented effort to motivate American workers to use more of the paid time off they have earned.

Executive Summary: An Assessment of Paid Time Off in the U.S.

Nearly three-quarters of all American workers earn paid time off including vacation time and personal days. Though a majority of workers recognize the personal and professional benefits of time off, most do not use all of the time they have earned. 

Fact Sheet: An Assessment of Paid Time Off in the U.S.

New research from Oxford Economics shows that American workers failed to use more than 400 million days of earned leave last year. This underutilization of paid time off has a substantial impact on the U.S. economy and is taking a heavy toll on workplace productivity, personal well-being and family relationships.

Latest News

Taking a Vacation May Actually Save Your Career

Bryce Covert breaks down the importance of taking a vacation for your career and the economy for New Republic. Based on the latest research, Bryce says being “crazy, driven, hard-working believers,” in Cadillac’s words, isn’t working out so well for the 99 percent.

Travel industry to Americans: "Take your vacation"

It's bad enough that U.S. workers get less paid vacation than their counterparts around the world, but many are afraid to take all the time off employers provide. The situation has become so glaring that the U.S. travel industry is actually starting a promotional effort to encourage people to take vacation.

Why Taking a Vacation Can Make You Better at Your Job

We say we want more time off, but most of us don't use all of our vacation time. Lisa Evan shares how life won't fall apart if you take two weeks off, in fact your work might actually improve. 

429 million vacation days go unused - Bad for workers, employers, economy

When my Dad was 72, he would joke that he didn’t want to retire because he enjoyed his vacations too much. My parents were among the vanguard of jetsetters in the 1960s, taking advantage of an onslaught of jumbo aircraft and affordable air fares. Karen Rubin writes of how things have changed and the Travel Effect for Examiner.com.

What Would You Do with an Extra Day?

America has one of the longest workweeks in the world. So it’s good news that nearly three in four employees earn some kind of time off, with an average benefit of 20 days per year. Gary Oster, Managing Director of Travel Effect, shares his Travel Effect with the American Resort Development Association's Vacation Better

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Fact

Twice as many Americans prioritize saving for travel compared to saving for a car or hobbies.